At the end of the ‘60s, the government wished to modernize Naples’ state framework, just like the imperial court of Vienna and the other Bourbon monarchies of Madrid and Paris. Perhaps with some schematization, but it can be said that there the politics of reforms was inspired by an ideology that may be defined jansenist jurisdictionalism. It was different from Enlightenment; it was a sort of Giannonism without Giannone, but with a strong Jansenist influence and which had widened its initial perspective of civil history to economic and social problems from the 1740’s. In this effort those governments tried to hold talks with Enlightenment thinkers. Also in Naples. The creation of the King’s Advocate (Avvocato del Re), a new office wanted in 1768 by minister Tanucci and supported by Neapolitan Enlightenment thinker Antonio Genovesi, was part of this European process. As we shall see, it arose amid controversy that revealed the disparity between the idea of reformation that Bourbon courts had in mind at the time, and the one that Enlightenment culture had spread across Europe. It also showed the ways in which Enlightenment culture and the policy of absolute governments tried to reach a point of contact. When this effort, too, ended in failure in 1776, with Tanucci’s fall in Naples and Turgot’s in Paris, it proved the degree by which the languages and horizons involved were different. The political language of the governments could be that of jurisdictionalism; but it could not be that of Enlightenment. .

Jansenist Jurisdictionalism and Enlightenment: two Ways of Thinking politics in Mid-Eighteenth Century Naples

IMBRUGLIA, Girolamo
2011

Abstract

At the end of the ‘60s, the government wished to modernize Naples’ state framework, just like the imperial court of Vienna and the other Bourbon monarchies of Madrid and Paris. Perhaps with some schematization, but it can be said that there the politics of reforms was inspired by an ideology that may be defined jansenist jurisdictionalism. It was different from Enlightenment; it was a sort of Giannonism without Giannone, but with a strong Jansenist influence and which had widened its initial perspective of civil history to economic and social problems from the 1740’s. In this effort those governments tried to hold talks with Enlightenment thinkers. Also in Naples. The creation of the King’s Advocate (Avvocato del Re), a new office wanted in 1768 by minister Tanucci and supported by Neapolitan Enlightenment thinker Antonio Genovesi, was part of this European process. As we shall see, it arose amid controversy that revealed the disparity between the idea of reformation that Bourbon courts had in mind at the time, and the one that Enlightenment culture had spread across Europe. It also showed the ways in which Enlightenment culture and the policy of absolute governments tried to reach a point of contact. When this effort, too, ended in failure in 1776, with Tanucci’s fall in Naples and Turgot’s in Paris, it proved the degree by which the languages and horizons involved were different. The political language of the governments could be that of jurisdictionalism; but it could not be that of Enlightenment. .
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11574/36837
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